Acute effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on muscle strength and power output

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Bibliographic Details
Title translated into German:Akute Auswirkungen von statischem und PNF-Stretching auf die Muskelkraft und -leistung
Author:Marek, Sarah M.; Cramer, Joel T.; Fincher, A. Louise; Massey, Laurie L. ; Dangelmaier, Suzanne M.; Purkayastha, Sushmita ; Fitz, Kristi A. ; Culbertson, Julie Y.
Published in:Journal of athletic training
Published:40 (2005), 2, S. 94-103, Lit.
Format: Publications (Database SPOLIT)
Publication Type: Journal article
Media type: Electronic resource (online) Print resource
Language:English
ISSN:1062-6050, 0160-8320, 1938-162X
Keywords:
Online Access:
Identification number:PU201011008921
Source:BISp

Abstract

Context: Stretching is commonly used as a technique for injury prevention in the clinical setting. Our findings may improve the understanding of the neuromuscular responses to stretching and help clinicians make decisions for rehabilitation progression and return to play. Objective: To examine the short-term effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on peak torque (PT), mean power output (MP), active range of motion (AROM), passive range of motion (PROM), electromyographic (EMG) amplitude, and mechanomyographic (MMG) amplitude of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris muscles during voluntary maximal concentric isokinetic leg extensions at 60 and 300°·s−1. Design: A randomized, counterbalanced, cross-sectional, repeated-measures design. Setting: A university human research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten female (age, 23 ± 3 years) and 9 male (age, 21 ± 3 years) apparently healthy and recreationally active volunteers. Intervention(s): Four static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises to stretch the leg extensor muscles of the dominant limb during 2 separate, randomly ordered laboratory visits. Main Outcome Measure(s): The PT and MP were measured at 60 and 300°·s−1, EMG and MMG signals were recorded, and AROM and PROM were measured at the knee joint before and after the stretching exercises. Results: Static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching reduced PT (P = .051), MP (P = .041), and EMG amplitude (P = .013) from prestretching to poststretching at 60 and 300°·s−1 (P < .05). The AROM (P < .001) and PROM (P = .001) increased as a result of the static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching. The MMG amplitude increased in the rectus femoris muscle in response to the static stretching at 60°·s−1 (P = .031), but no other changes in MMG amplitude were observed (P > .05). Conclusions: Both static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching caused similar deficits in strength, power output, and muscle activation at both slow (60°·s−1) and fast (300°·s−1) velocities. The effect sizes, however, corresponding to these stretching-induced changes were small, which suggests the need for practitioners to consider a risk-to-benefit ratio when incorporating static or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching. Verf.-Referat