Concussions and intracranial injuries in athletics

Titel: Concussions and intracranial injuries in athletics
Deutscher übersetzter Titel: Gehirnerschuetterungen und intrakraniale Verletzungen im Sport
Autor: McWhorter, J. Michael
Zeitschriftentitel: Athletic training
Format: Zeitschriften­artikel
Medienart: Gedruckte Ressource
Sprache: Englisch
Veröffentlicht: 25 (1990), 2 , S. 129-131, Lit.
Schlagworte: American Football; Gehirnerschütterung; Kopfverletzung; Schädelhirnverletzung; Schädelverletzung; Sportmedizin; Sporttraumatologie; Sportverletzung; Tod; Unfallstatistik;
Erfassungsnummer: PU199105045629
Quelle: BISp
Gespeichert in:

Abstract

Football, one of the most popular sports in our country today, is associated with a substantial number of injuries occurring as a result of participation in that sport. It has been estimated that approximately 600,000 injuries related to football occur annually. From the years 1931 to 1976 there were 822 fatalities occurring in football players. Of these, 80 were due to traumata to the head and cervical spine. In another series covering the years 1950 to 1955, 386 of 8,586 injuries sustained by high school football players involved the head. It is very difficult to separate head and neck injuries that occur in contact sports. I must emphasize that any sport that is popular in the United States today has the potential of becoming a contact or a collision sport. The latest participation figures show that there are some 1.3 million players participating in junior and senior high school football, and 75,000 players participating on the university level. According to MUELLER and BLYTH in the second annual report covering the years 1983 and 1984 of the National Center for Catastrophic Sports Injury Research, there were a total of 24 high school fatalities, and 6 fatalities at the college level. Ten of the high school fatalities were due to head injuries. There were also 21 non-fatal catastrophic injuries in football which resulted in permanent paralysis, all being the direct result of fractured cervical vertebra. Surprisingly, fewer injuries are sustained by sand lot players than by high school or college level players. Verf.-Referat

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