The effect of parental logistic support on physical activity in children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties

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Bibliographic Details
Title translated into German:Der Einfluss der logistischen Unterstützung durch die Eltern auf die körperliche Aktivität von Kindern mit Bewegungsschwierigkeiten oder mit einem entsprechendem Risiko
Author:Wright, Kemi E.; Furzer, Bonnie J.; Licari, Melissa K.; Dimmock, James A.; Jackson, Ben
Published in:Journal of science and medicine in sport
Published:23 (2020), 4, S. 372-376, Lit.
Format: Publications (Database SPOLIT)
Publication Type: Journal article
Media type: Electronic resource (online) Print resource
Language:English
ISSN:1440-2440, 1878-1861
Keywords:
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Identification number:PU202007005295
Source:BISp

Author's abstract

Objectives: In a sample of children with, or at risk of, movement difficulties, (1) To test the direct effects of children’s perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity on children’s physical activity-related self-perceptions and on children’s physical activity levels, and (2) To explore the indirect relationship between children’s perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children’s physical activity levels through children’s physical activity-related self-perceptions. Design: Cross-sectional observation study. Methods: Data were collected from 120 children aged 6 to 12 years; movement proficiency levels were determined using the movement assessment battery for children-2 test. Children’s perspectives of parental support for physical activity were captured using the Activity Support Scale for Multiple Groups child report. Children’s self-perceptions towards physical activity were reported with the Children’s Self- perceptions of Adequacy in and Predilections for physical activity, and time spent in physical activity were measured using accelerometers. Results: There was no significant direct effect between perceived levels of parents’ logistic support for physical activity and children’s physical activity. A significant indirect relationship between these variables was discovered, with higher perceived levels of parent logistical support for physical activity predicting stronger perceptions of adequacy (i.e., confidence) toward physical activity participation among children, which in turn was associated with increased physical activity minutes. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that irrespective of a child’s movement ability, children’s perceptions of parents’ logistic support for physical activity indirectly and positively predicts children’s physical activity levels, via children’s confidence for physical activity.