Incidence of exercise-induced bronchospasm and exercise-induced hypoxaemia in female varsity hockey players

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Bibliographic Details
Title translated into German:Hinweis auf belastungsinduzierten Bronchospasmus und auf belastungsinduzierte Hypoxämie bei College-Hockeyspielerinnen
Author:Game, Alex B.; Voaklander, Donald C.; Syrotuik, Daniel G.; Bell, Gordon J.
Published in:Research in sports medicine
Published:11 (2003), 1 , S. 11-21, Lit.
Format: Publications (Database SPOLIT)
Publication Type: Journal article
Media type: Print resource
Language:English
ISSN:1543-8627, 1543-8635
Keywords:
Online Access:
Identification number:PU200407001981
Source:BISp

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to investigate the incidence of exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB) and exercise-induced hypoxemia (EIH) in female varsity ice hockey players following a competitive season. Arterial saturation (%SpO2) levels were measured using noninasive oximetry during a maximal oxygen consumption test (VO2max) on a cycle ergometer, and pulmonary function was assessed at rest and 1, 10, 15 and 25 min after the VO2max test conducted at ice level in an arena. The arena and outdoor environment were examined for temperature, relative humidity, gaseous chemicals, molds, and fungus. Four of 17 players presented with EIB, and 13 of 17 playewrs suffered from EIH. Mean forced expiratory flow (FEF25-75%) at 10, 15 and 25 min after exercise was significantly lower than the 1 min postexercise value. There was a positive correlation between %SpO2 and forced vital capacity obtained 10, 15, 25 min post VO2max test (r= 0.57, 0.55, 0.57). The arena temperature was 16°C and relative humidity was 40% during testing. Sulfur dioxide was 0.9 ppm, and carbon monoxide 0.16 ppm. In addition, a variety of airbone molds were revealed in the arena. It was concluded that preciouly undiagnosed EIB and EIH were apparent in 23.5 % and 76 % of the female varsity hockey players in the present study at the end of a competitive season. It also was shown that the ice arena environment in which the trained and competed throughout the season contained the presence of some airbone contaminants known to influence EIB and pulmonary function. Verf.-Referat