Effect of exercise training on heat-shock response in strenuous exercise

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Bibliographic Details
Title translated into German:Auswirkung von Ausdauertraining auf die Hitzeschockreaktion bei erschoepfender koerperlicher Belastung
Author:Yabunaka, Noriyuki; Ohtsuka, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Ichiro; Noro, Hiroshi; Fujisawa, Hiroyuki; Agishi, Yuko
Published in:Japanese journal of physical fitness and sports medicine
Published:43 (1994), 5 , S. 399-405, Lit.
Format: Publications (Database SPOLIT)
Publication Type: Journal article
Media type: Print resource
Language:Japanese
ISSN:0039-906X
Keywords:
Online Access:
Identification number:PU199504100921
Source:BISp

Author's abstract

This study was conducted to examine the effect of exercise training on heat-shock response, the protective response to heat, oxidative stress and other stresses characterized by elevated synthesis of heat-shock proteins (HSP), in strenuous exercise. Five untrained men (aged 20-21) participated in the study. The protocol included strenuous exercise to exhaustion by bicycle ergometer (1st Ex), 4 weeks of training (a 2 km run three days per week) and a repetition of the strenuous exercise ( 2nd Ex). We measured VO2 and VCO2 with a respiratory-gas analyzer, 70 kDa heat-shock protein (HSP70) of mononuclear cells by western blotting, and rectal and mean skin temperatures by thermistors during the strenuous exercise. After 4 weeks of training, VO2max was increased significantly. HSP70 increased immediately after the exercise in 3 of 5 subjects in the 1st Ex, but not in the 2nd Ex. Rectal temperatures rose significantly after both the 1st and 2nd Ex. Mean skin temperatures fell significantly after both the 1st and 2nd Ex. There was no correlation between rectal and mean skin temperatures and HSP70. We observed the heat-shock response during strenuous exercise and the attenuation of this response after 4 weeks of exercise training. These results suggest that exercise training may have suppressive effects on the heat-shock response during strenuous exercise. Verf.-Referat