IS DAILY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY PLEASANT FOR OLDER ADULTS? BETWEEN- AND WITHIN-PERSON ASSOCIATIONS

Author: Nakagawa, T.; Kabayama, M.; Matsuda, K.; Yasumoto, S.; Gondo, Y.; Kamide, K.; Ikebe, K.
Language: English
Published: 2017
Source: PubMed Central (PMC)
Online Access: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6246297/
https://doi.org/10.1093/geroni/igx004.1776
Identification number: ftpubmed:oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:6246297

Summary

Interventional and experimental studies suggest that physical activity improves well-being across one’s lifespan. However, if and how daily physical activity influences well-being in advanced old age in natural settings is yet to be elucidated. An intensive longitudinal study was conducted with older adults (aged 82 – 85 years; N = 38) over seven days. Daily positive affect and physical activity were measured using daily diaries and accelerometers, respectively. Positive affect was reported at the end of each day, and physical activity was assessed by the average walk counts per hour every day. Between-person physical activity was positively associated with daily affect, thus indicating that a more active person exhibited higher positive affect. However, physical activity and positive affect was negatively associated within-person; On days when a typical older individual was more physically active, he/she experienced lower positive affect. Gender, mental health, and Body Mass Index did not moderate this within-person association. These findings indicate that, although usual physical activity could increase positive affect, i.e., feelings of energy, daily physical activity might decrease it in older adults. Practitioners and clinicians should recognize the short- and long-term effects of physical activity on the well-being of very old individuals. Future studies are required to further explore the underlying mechanism and understand how age-related changes limit a within-person revitalization process.