A pilot educational intervention for headache and concussion: The headache and arts program

Author: Minen, Mia T.; Boubour, Alexandra
Language: English
Published: 2018
Source: PubMed Central (PMC)
Online Access: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5957308/
https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000005521
Identification number: ftpubmed:oai:pubmedcentral.nih.gov:5957308

Summary

OBJECTIVE: Using a science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics (STEAM) curriculum, we developed, piloted, and tested the Headache and Arts Program. This program seeks to increase knowledge and awareness of migraine and concussion among high school students through a visual arts–based curriculum. METHODS: We developed a 2-week Headache and Arts Program with lesson plans and art assignments for high school visual arts classes and an age-appropriate assessment to assess students' knowledge of migraine and concussion. We assessed students' knowledge through (1) the creation of artwork that depicted the experience of a migraine or concussion, (2) the conception and implementation of methods to transfer knowledge gained through the program, and (3) preassessment and postassessment results. The assessment was distributed to all students prior to the Headache and Arts Program. In a smaller sample, we distributed the assessment 3 months after the program to assess longitudinal effects. Descriptive analyses and p values were calculated using SPSS V.24 and Microsoft Excel. RESULTS: Forty-eight students participated in the research program. Students created artwork that integrated STEAM knowledge learned through the program and applied creative methods to teach others about migraine and concussion. At baseline, students' total scores averaged 67.6% correct. Total scores for the longitudinal preassessment, immediate postassessment, and delayed 3-month postassessment averaged 69.4%, 72.8%, and 80.0% correct, respectively. CONCLUSION: The use of a visual arts–based curriculum may be effective for migraine and concussion education among high school students.