GAIT ANALYSIS OF THE HIND LIMB IN LABRADOR RETRIEVERS WITH AND WITHOUT CRANIAL CRUCIATE LIGAMENT DISEASE BY

Author: Chantal Anne; Maryvonne Ragetly; Dominique J Griffon Co-chair
Language: English
Source: CiteSeerX
Online Access: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.228.4332
http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/summary?doi=10.1.1.228.4332
Identification number: ftciteseerx:oai:CiteSeerX.psu:10.1.1.228.4332

Summary

Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) deficiency is the leading cause of lameness affecting the stifle joints of large breed dogs, especially Labrador Retrievers. Although CCL disease has been studied extensively, its exact pathogenesis and the primary cause leading to CCL rupture remain controversial. However, weakening secondary to repetitive microtrauma is currently believed to cause the majority of CCL instabilities diagnosed in dogs. Techniques of gait analysis have become the most productive tools to investigate normal and pathological gait in human and veterinary subjects. The inverse dynamics analysis approach models the limb as a series of connected linkages and integrates morphometric data to yield information about the net joint moment, patterns of muscle power and joint reaction forces. The results of these studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the pathogenesis of joint diseases in humans. A muscular imbalance between the hamstring and quadriceps muscles has been suggested as a cause for anterior cruciate ligament rupture in female athletes. Based on these findings, neuromuscular training programs leading to a relative risk reduction of up to 80 % has been designed. In spite of the cost and morbidity associated with CCL disease and its management, very few studies have focused on the inverse dynamics gait analysis of this