Effects of optimization technique on simulated muscle activations and forces

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Bibliographic Details
Title translated into German:Auswirkungen der Optimierungstechnik auf simulierte Muskelaktivierungen und -kräfte
Author:Roelker, Sarah A.; Caruthers, Elena J.; Hall, Rachel K.; Pelz, Nicholas C.; Chaudhari, Ajit M.W.; Siston, Robert A.
Published in:Journal of applied biomechanics
Published:36 (2020), 4, S. 259–278, Lit.
Format: Publications (Database SPOLIT)
Publication Type: Journal article
Media type: Print resource Electronic resource (online)
Language:English
ISSN:1065-8483, 1543-2688
Keywords:
Online Access:
Identification number:PU202010009375
Source:BISp

Abstract

Two optimization techniques, static optimization (SO) and computed muscle control (CMC), are often used in OpenSim to estimate the muscle activations and forces responsible for movement. Although differences between SO and CMC muscle function have been reported, the accuracy of each technique and the combined effect of optimization and model choice on simulated muscle function is unclear. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively compare the SO and CMC estimates of muscle activations and forces during gait with the experimental data in the Gait2392 and Full Body Running models. In OpenSim (version 3.1), muscle function during gait was estimated using SO and CMC in 6 subjects in each model and validated against experimental muscle activations and joint torques. Experimental and simulated activation agreement was sensitive to optimization technique for the soleus and tibialis anterior. Knee extension torque error was greater with CMC than SO. Muscle forces, activations, and co-contraction indices tended to be higher with CMC and more sensitive to model choice. CMC’s inclusion of passive muscle forces, muscle activation-contraction dynamics, and a proportional-derivative controller to track kinematics contributes to these differences. Model and optimization technique choices should be validated using experimental activations collected simultaneously with the data used to generate the simulation.