Tympanic temperature and skin temperatures during upper limb exercise in patients with spinal cord injury

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Bibliographic Details
Title translated into German:Innenohr- und Hauttemperaturen bei Muskelarbeit der oberen Extremitaeten von Querschnittsgelaehmten
Author:Ishii, Kojiro; Yamasaki, Masahiro; Muraki, Satoshi; Komura, Takashi; Kikuchi, Kunio; Miyagawa, Toshiaki; Fujimoto, Shigeo; Maeda, Kazuya
Published in:Japanese journal of physical fitness and sports medicine
Published:44 (1995), 4 , S. 447-456, Lit.
Format: Publications (Database SPOLIT)
Publication Type: Journal article
Media type: Print resource
Language:Japanese
ISSN:0039-906X
Keywords:
Online Access:
Identification number:PU199605107640
Source:BISp

Author's abstract

To clarify changes in body temperature during endurance exercise in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI), we measured tympanic temperature (Tty) and skin temperature in the head, arm, chest, thigh, shin and calf in 5 patients with SCI (T6-T12) and 7 normal controls during 30 minutes arm cranking exercise (20 watts) from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise until 10 minutes after the termination of exercise in an artificial climate room at a temperature of about 25øC with a relative humidity of about 50%. The Tty in the SCI group was lower than that in the control group from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise to 10 minutes after the termination of exercise with a significant difference only at the initiation of exercise. The difference in Tty slightly decreased with continuation of exercise. The Tty in the SCI group at rest was 36.05-37.15øC. Four patients in the group showed a decrease of 0.04-0.12øC in the early stage and an increase of 0.66øC+/-0.19 (mean+/-SD) at the end of exercise over the value at the initiation of exercise. The skin temperature was lower in the SCI group than in the control group in all sites excluding the arm. Significant differences were observed in the head in the early stage of exercise and after exercise, in the chest from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise to 5 minutes after the termination of exercise, in the thigh from 10 minutes before the initiation of exercise to 10 minutes after the termination of exercise, in the shin 10 minutes and 5 minutes before the initiation of exercise, and in the calf from before to 15 minutes after the initiation of exercise. In the SCI group, marked individual differences were observed in the skin temperatures in the thigh, shin, and calf, suggesting specificity of the skin temperature response in and near the paralysis area. Results in Tty in this study suggested no heat retention in the SCI patients. Therefore, the risk for heat disorders seems to be low during moderate or mild exercise under moderate temperature environment at a temperature of about 25øC with a relative humidity of about 50% even when the skin temperature is low, and thermolysis is not marked. Verf.-Referat